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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
the coordinated bomb blasts in india's financial capital. >> ifill: political editor david chalian takes us inside president obama's record- breaking 2012 money haul. >> woodruff: paul solman reports on an ohio company that guarantees its workers jobs even during a recession. >> a vast, century old lincoln electric in the heart of the rust belt, workers average $28 an hour and yet there hasn't been a layoff here in at least 70 years. >> ifill: and we check in on how the pentagon is repealing its "don't ask, don't tell" policy starting with the acceptance of gay recruits. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them
they are in the range of 2.5, whereas merging markets are more in the range of 6.5, some of them such as india and china getting higher marks, so we are facing a turnaround which is very uneven with country's leading the charge and not those that were historic leading the charge and others advanced economies that are lagging behind in a way given the status of development. in the midst of that, we have clearly the two categories different issues to address but if we are to provide service and guidance, advice and recommendations and if and when necessary and if asked support. those are on the one hand the issues of sovereign debt and concerns all advanced economies ranging from japan to the united states, but clearly with a focus as you write about it as we know with a focus on the year autozone and in particular a country such as greece. on the other hand, when we look at emerging markets we have in some corners the risk of overheating, and we obviously have the risk of inflation as well, and sometimes particularly in the low-income countries the risk of imported completion that results from a high pri
of the constitution that will result to the states india, she should be able to make that claim, and so we told the supreme court take this case even though we lost, so they took the case and in the appointed a private lawyer to argue with the government would have argued in terms of her not having a legal standing, the right to bring the case and then after hearing the oral arguments they wrote an opinion that said that that private lawyer wasn't right for their service, vice versa, but at the end of the day after hearing the argument. >> think about the prosecutor in the perry mason series that he confessed error. there would be no novels, no nothing. [laughter] >> sometimes the courts and the car in the tory area and follow the latter in the supreme court issued but not the spirit, and one of my favorites was in the plaintiffs' court in texas they have some good places to make a living and the court had said the highlight line for punitive damage is $9 of the punitive for every 1 dollar a factual or compensatory damages. so a person who never earned more than maybe a thousand dollars a year
of those tax cuts in china or in india or job creation in many other places other than here. and the balance part of this amendment requires the passage of a balanced budget constitutional amendment that would require a supermajority to raise any new revenue or close any wasteful tax loopholes. so in other words, you don't have to have a supermajority to decide where and what you're going to wind up spending but you have to have a supermajority in order to raise any revenue or close an egregious tax loophole. one that may have no economic purpose, may be completely outdated, may be a sweetheart deal that got into the tax code over o the course of the years, but you still have to get a supermajority to get rid of that. everybody here knows how hard it is to get 60 votes. a lot of the business in the united states senate has been caught up by the eternal filibuster. every single nomination, every single small piece of legislation that comes to the floor of the senate, everything requires a motion to proceed which requires 60 votes, which is effectively a filibuster each time.
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)